Mentor Story: Alma Maria Rinasz

When I first told my QA engineer friend, Gilda, that I wanted to learn how to program in C, she couldn’t understand why an English teacher would want  to learn to code. Yet, a couple of weeks later, Gilda was tutoring me on my CS50 homework, and we set the foundations for our social enterprise, C Girls Code.

Two years later, we’ve brought Technovation Challenge to Central Mexico. Gilda convinced me of the importance of sharing our knowledge and teaching other women and girls about entrepreneurship and programming with Technovation Challenge. And just like she was willing to help me when I first sat down to learn about conditionals and loops, I understood that I had to do the same for young women.

Gilda and I have helped get the word out and assemble a team of mentors who are working with twenty girls from a halfway house. We have encountered challenges along the way, but we’ve also found so much support and willingness from our community, our friends and family. We’ve had to take baby steps with our girls, many of whom don’t get to use a computer regularly. So when our girls learned to test their very first app using the App Inventor, we couldn’t have been prouder. We even have a non-girl team (I’m mentoring my son and three of his friends).

Technovation Challenge has allowed me to live something that not only is important but in alignment with my own interests and life-long goals. I believe that I must be a part of the positive change by setting a positive example and giving back to my community. As a mother, I want my children to see me doing just that and to understand why it is important for us to be the change we want to see in the world. During the time that I’ve been volunteering with Technovation Challenge, I became unemployed. I decided to use my time to bring to together my writing skills, online experience, and digital media know-how to author a book for Mexican immigrants living in the United States. Deported: A Survival Guide for Natural Born Mexicans is a culmination of what I try to do every day (be of service and create value) and how I want to be remembered in this world: as someone who was a woman for a change.

Alma Maria Rinasz is the author of Deported: A Survival Guide for Natural Born Mexicans, and a 2017 Technovation Mentor.